July 23, 2021

Roberta Walters' Azaleas 101 - A Guide to Seasonal Azalea Care

            Few species of bonsai can compete with the visual intrigue produced by an azalea in full bloom. For that reason, today I have to resist the flowery temptation to write a full on history of their use in bonsai and review manual for Azalea techniques (maybe someday...). Instead, I'll whet your appetite with a more manageable intro to azalea-specific information through long-lost excerpts from one of California's premier azalea expert, Roberta Walters.

            Roberta is a past president of both the Satsuki (Azalea) Bonsai Club (now known as Bay Area Satsuki Aikokai) in Sacramento and Golden State Bonsai Federation, as well as a founding member of the Chico Bonsai Society. Among her many decades in bonsai, Roberta intensely studied azaleas under Mr. Gondo and Mr Nakiyama who shared their expertise from working professionally on azalea bonsai in Japan. In April of 2001, Roberta came to share this knowledge as the visiting guest artist Puget Sound Bonsai Association. This went on to be only one small part of Roberta's career in bonsai education and she went on to be awarded the Circle of Sensei Award by the Golden State Bonsai Federation.

            Over the same years as Roberta's bonsai career bloomed, the Puget Sound Bonsai Association maintained a long tradition of recording our guest artist meetings to make available to club members through the club library in VHS and DVD format. The DVD copies however have languished mostly unused by members for many years now. As most people my age don't even have DVD players anymore, I've been working on and off with my former club to digitize their collection and post the older demonstrations on Youtube for all to enjoy. The highlights of Roberta's presentation are a continuation of this collaboration. Read below to see the major topics Roberta discussed in her demonstration. The full playlist of Roberta's demonstration is available on the Puget Sound Bonsai Association's Youtube Channel.

This old azalea by Dan Robinson (collected decades ago by his first student. Frank) is a prime example of their potential spring beauty. Although it is already covered with pink flowers, this tree is still a few days away from peak bloom. At that time it would be so covered in pink that you can't even see the leaves! It's no wonder this tree won the People's Choice Award at the 2017 PSBA Spring Show.

April 21, 2021

A Case Study for Applying the Water and Sugar Equations - Repotting the Risky Rose

Source material: 3/19/2021

            Hola bonsai amigos! Today is a great day because not only does your friendly neighborhood microbiologist (me!) receive his second Covid vaccine dose, but my immunized arms also come bearing another present to the bonsai community. As spring continues to march on, so too does the blog's coverage of my giant rosebush bonsai - this time the rose's latest repot reveals two fundamental equations of life to consider when manipulating bonsai or any plant.

            The "Risky Rose" was the second major repot I did this year; returning readers will recall from last week's post that this operation involved another of the largest trees in my collection - a yardadori/landscape origin rosebush turned bonsai. As discussed in the previous post, now that the tree has recovered several years after its initial transplanting endured a cross-country move and survived its first Ohio winter, our rose has definitely earned renewed attention this year. For now, I'm calling it the "Risky Rose" because it needed severe root reduction in order to change its planting angle and lift the upper half of the trunk out of the pot. Read on to understand the motivations behind this bold action, including what steps were taken to ensure this radical root reduction could be done safely.

            As with my last repotting post, "Repotting The Monster Mulberry - Revisiting the Basics", this repot was done with the help of my friend in the Columbus Bonsai Society, Kevin. Thanks, Kevin!

Sections

April 13, 2021

Origins of the Risky Rose & Steps for Transplant Recovery

 Source material: 2/09/2018

            As the weather continues to warm up and frosts become rarer here in Ohio, repotting season is on its tail end - if you're not already finished with it. I'm hoping to squeeze in my last few this week and also plan ahead for future bonsai by sowing my newest batch of seeds. In the spirit of finishing the repotting season, I was also planning to post the second major repot I did this year - once which involves substantial risk and reward. For now, that's all you'll get about it because, in the spirit of breaking my habit of writing overly long articles, today we have to first take a trip back in time and discuss the history of my gargantuan rosebush landscape-origin/yardadori prebonsai. It has perhaps the largest trunk rose I've seen in the bonsai world (not that they're a common bonsai subject to begin with!).

Sections

1. History of the Risky Rose
2. Current Repot Operation (Next post)
3.  Blog Announcements

Possible planting angle #1 (This is how it was originally buried).

March 23, 2021

Repotting The Monster Mulberry - Revisiting the Basics

Source material: 3/16/2021

            After a few weeks of being buried in snow, last week my larch seedlings started setting off alarm bells with green needles bursting from their dormant buds. "REPOTTING SEASON IS HERE, GET YOUR A@# INTO HIGH GEAR!" - is probably what they were telling me. I quickly reorganized my work and homework schedule to make the past week as bonsai-focused as possible for this narrow springtime window. While spring is also the perfect time for planting seeds, today we will discuss the first of a handful of major repots I did last week. Today's repotting report focuses on one of the largest trees in my collection at the moment - a yardadori/landscape origin mulberry tree.

            This repot was done with the help of my friend in the Columbus Bonsai Society, Kevin. Kevin grew up around Portland, Oregon and moved to Ohio just a year or two before I moved back. It's been great having another PNW native person to talk bonsai with. Thanks for your help building the grow box, Kevin! Y'all will definitely see more of him in future projects on this blog 😉.

Sections

First up: The Monster Mulberry with a falling apart plastic pot (hence the need for the repot).

February 22, 2021

Seed Experiment #1 - Survival Methods for Early Germinators

This article was supposed to go out before my last one, but apparently finding time to photoshop memes is much easier than reading research articles on acorn germination… Anyways, let’s just pretend this article came out a month ago so I don’t have to slow it down by rewriting the introduction.

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Source content: 12/20/2020

Hellooooooo bonsai world! It’s been a minute since I posted but I'm happy to report I am alive and well in Ohio. To celebrate surviving the first semester of my Ph.D. program, it's only fitting that my first blog post of 2021 focuses on a bonsai experiment I'm designing - the first of many I have in mind.

Of course, throughout the move to Columbus and starting graduate school, maintaining my bonsai collection has remained a priority even if new articles and videos were put on hold. In August, I packed my trees into a UHaul and drove my trimmed-down collection across the country. Since then, I’ve also found time to scout for local Ohio yamadori, service trees for my first local client, attend two workshops at Yume-en (Rob Hoffman’s new bonsai nursery in Marysville, OH), assemble my first grow tent for overwintering my tropicals, collect new seeds stock for 2021, and join the Columbus Bonsai Society’s Board for 2021. All of these and more from my archive could be future blog posts so stay tuned!

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A young Brewer's oak seedling emerges!

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